Legends Blog

Youtube Volume 1 October 21 2017, 0 Comments

Mickey Mantle Stories

 Mickey Mantle was known as a fantastic character throughout his time. These stories highlight some of the Mick's antics from the man himself. Enjoy.

 

NBA 90s Complete Set

One of the great projects NBA TV has undertaken. NB90's features almost 2 hours of footage committed to highlighting the greatest players, teams and basketball cultures of the 1990's.

 

1986 Mets - The Best Last Best Plane Ride Ever

 Done by Victory Journal and drawn by James Blagden, this video highlights the Mets epic plane ride after their win in the 1986 Divisional series.

 

 Wally Backman Epic Meltdown

Probably the best meltdown by a baseball manager of all time. And he was mic'd up for the game. Backman played 2nd base on the championship Mets team from 1986.

 

Dr. J NBA TV Documentary

 Dr J was a unique athlete during his time, largely unknown and unseen at the beginning of his career. Toward the end he was one of the most celebrated and loved athletes ever.


Greatest Pitches in Baseball History August 28 2017, 1 Comment

        We breakdown the best pitches in baseball history and the pitchers that threw them best. There have been many variations of pitch types and the way those pitches are gripped. However we tried to focus our study on 16 individual pitches.

Sandy Kofax Curveball
Curveball - Sandy Kofax
         One of the oldest known pitches in baseball, the curveball has been around since 1860. While great men have tried to achieve the perfect curve, only a few can really make a case for that claim.
         Sandy Kofax curve seem to strike more fear in his opponents hearts than anyone. Kofax truly puzzled his opponents with his massive breaking ball. His curve was a classic 12-6 curve with the classic wrist snap and the magic forward rotation all culminating in a great curve. The Kofax signature pitch dropped vertically 12 to 24 inches due to his exaggerated arm motion. Kofax also tipped his curve ball and it didn't seem to help hitters out at all. The lefty’s strange elongated alien fingers were his greatest weapon. The extra long fingers allowed Kofax to throw the curveball with extra spin that wasn't often seem from anyone. Pittsburgh Pirates great Willie Stargell once commented that hitting off of Kofax was like “trying to drink coffee with a fork.”
         Mr. Cub, shortstop Ernie Banks once described it, “Sandy’s curve had a lot more spin than anyone else’s. It spun like a fastball coming out of his hand. It jumped at the end.”
Reliever Rob Neyer called it “the best curve of all time”.
         One slugger most pitchers were forbidden to throw a curveball to was Mickey Mantle. The “Mick” was so strong that even if he was fooled on a curve, he could keep his hands back and drive the ball out of the park. During Mantle’s second at bat of the 1963 World Series (Mantle struck out his first time up). Ball comes in high, just before reaching the plate it dives, crossing the plate by Mantle’s knees. Mantle never moves the bat, umpire calls strike three. Mantle stands there, then turns to the catcher and says, “How the fuck is anybody supposed to hit that shit?”.
         The best Kofax story came over 15 years after he retried. When coaching briefly for the Los Angeles Dodgers, he would sometimes throw batting practice. On this day, the batter asked Kofax to throw his famous deuce. So Kofax indulged his request, and begins to throw his hook. First curve comes, swing and miss. Another comes, same result. Then several more big Kofax hooks go by untouched. By this time the entire Dodgers roster was in hysterics. The hitter eventually gives up and others want a piece of the action. The 45 year old Kofax proceeds to embarrass the entire LA lineup (Dodger line-up with Sax, Garvey, Baker and Cey), not one of them touched his curve. Eventually the great Tommy Lasorda walked out to the mound and asked him to stop. He told Kofax that he didn't want his hitters mentally destroyed just before a post seasons series, because they can’t hit a one-pitch man in his 40’s.
         Big league scout Tim Dempsey once commuted “Koufax’s curve may have been the very toughest curve to hit ever, because of its steep north-south drop, offering less time in the strike zone.” The sharp breaking ball took a tremendous toll on the arm of Sandy. Over time the blood began draining from his left index finger, leaving it numb. Although Sandy dominated for only 5 seasons, no one can argue with his curveball when it was on.
Runner Up: Barry Zito

Hoyt Willhelm Knuckleball
Knuckleball - Hoyt Willhelm
         Perhaps the Godfather of the modern knuckleball, Hoyt Willhelm’s knuckleballs were so wicked catchers were forced to use larger gloves when catching him. Although their have been many great knuckles, none have been thrown with more movement.
         He played for nine different teams during his career, racking up 228 saves to go with a 2.52 ERA. The reliever was able to play in 8 All-Star games and pitched till the age of 49. He was the first pitcher to reach 200 saves, and the first to appear in 1,000 games. Most of those accomplishments are compliments of the knuckleball.
         Throwing the pitch required several different procedure steps to ensure its delivery. He carefully aligned his fingers not to touch the laces and then guided the ball out with his fingertips. Willhelm always had to make sure his fingernails were trimmed to a t, as he was often seen with nail clippers throughout his career.
         Many think that Phil Niekro was a better knuckleball pitcher, of course Wilhelm was the one that taught Nieko the knuckleball. Former teammate Moose Skowron commented on Wilhelm's key pitch, saying, "He threw the best knuckleball I ever saw. You never knew what Hoyt's pitch would do. I don't think he did either.” Executive Roland Hemond agreed, saying, "Wilhelm's knuckleball did more than anyone else’s”. "He had the best knuckleball you'd ever want to see," said Brooks Robinson. "He knew where it was going when he threw it, but when he got two strikes on you, he'd break out one that even he didn't know where it was going.”
         In a funny way a passed balls that get by the catcher are a bags of honor for a knuckleballer, specially at the major league level. These catchers are top of the line and some of them have serious trouble catching the pitch. During one of Wilhelm's appearances that season, catcher Ray Katt committed four passed balls in one inning to set the major league record. Orioles catchers had difficulty catching Wilhelm again in 1959 and they set an MLB record with 49 passed balls.
Runner Up: Phil Neikro

Nolan Ryan Fastball
Fastball - Nolan Ryan
         Throwing a baseball 100 mph is a rare physical feat that 1 and every million person could achieve. In a world of special grips and breaking pitches, the fastball has always stayed true. Some believe the pitch is the ultimate symbol of essence and truth in sports.
         Hall of Fame pitcher Nolan Ryan always had a fastball that was a cut above the rest. Mr. October Reggie Jackson probably summed the pitcher up best "Ryan is the only guy who puts fear in me. Not because he can get you out but because he can kill you."
         A legendary Ryan story goes like this, Bo Jackson hit a line drive back at the mound that struck Nolan Ryan in the face. Blood shot out of his lip and splattered on his uniform. Ryan found the ball on the ground and calmly picked it up for the out at first. When Bo came up to bat again no one was left sitting in their seats. We were pumped and cheered because everyone in Arlington Stadium knew what was coming. Four pitches were thrown, all fastballs, and they were the fastest pitches I'll ever see. Bo nicked one of them, but couldn't catch up to the other three.”
         Major league baseball decided it would start measuring the speed of the pitch right out of the pitchers hand in 1997. When Ryan was recorded, they measured the velocity of the pitches 10 feet from the plate. It means Ryan’s fastball would probably clock someone around 105 mph, much different than the 100 mph accounted to him by the Guinness Book of World Records. Not to mention his first measurement was made in the 9th inning of a start.
         Aroldis Chapman’s pitch at 105.1mph is the fastest in the record books but probably wasn’t truly faster than Ryan’s record setting pitch. That’s because when the two pitches crossed the plate, Chapman’s pitch was moving at an estimated 96.5mph while Nolan Ryan’s was still moving at a staggering 99.1mph.
         He was 46, when he tore his ulnar collateral ligament on September 22nd, 1993. He threw one last pitch in order to test his arm before coming out of the game. That pitch was clocked at 98mph, outstanding considering that he didn’t have a functioning elbow.
         Some feats of longevity are simply more impressive than others. Ryan’s fastball stayed true until his upper 30’s and even 40s. Spanning 3 different decades Ryan dominated for 27 major league seasons.
         The most impressive Ryan stat might stand forever, he struck out 5,714 batters, next highest is Randy Johnson with 4,875 strikeouts. The un-hittable than Hall of Famer set the all-time records for strikeouts (5,714), hits per nine innings (6.6) and no-hitters (seven). Ryan holds the single-season record for strikeouts (383 in 1973), topped 300 six times, and led his league in strikeouts 11 times (4 from 1987-1990, when he was 40-43).
Runner-up Aroldis Chapman

Randy Johnson Slider
Slider - Randy Johnson
         The hard breaking ball that tails down and away through the hitters zone. The speed thrown on a slider is often harder than a curveball. It includes a downwards pull on the ball as it is released, its released off the index finger. Movement is thought to be created from a mixture of fingertip pressure and grip.
         The pitcher with the nastiest slider was California native Randy Johnson. One of the most intimidating pitchers in the history of baseball. The 6-10 lefty threw a mostly sidearm delivery, usually resulted in very high velocities. His great size gave him a release point that few batters had ever seen before. His slider dipped about 15 inches and was thrown at 90 mph. The pitch was notorious for running on the hands of right handed batters and running away from lefties. His slider results in many more ground balls compared to other pitchers' sliders and produced a extremely high number of swings & misses. The combination of Johnson's size, his release point and his velocity has made him almost every hitter's least favorite pitcher. Jack Wilson of the Pirates commented “I think it's the greatest strikeout pitch ever, right up there with Nolan Ryan's fastball. Randy's slider might be the best slider in the history of the game." Checkout this clip of Johnson's slider via the catcher cam.
         Johnson’s slider gave some of the best hitters alive serious problems. Fittingly, the player with the most career at-bats against Johnson got embarrassed. Hall of Famer Rickey Henderson went 7-for-59 with zero RBIs and 30 strikeouts. Hall of Famer Tony Gwyenn said, "The slider is unhittable for a left-handed hitter. I'd bet the farm it's coming, and I still can't hit it. I got a hit off it once, and I wanted to keep the ball.”
         The most fitting tribute to the greatness of Randy Johnson came in the playoffs when Baltimore Orioles manager Davey Johnson benched his three best left-handed hitters, Rafael Palmeiro, B.J. Surhoff and Roberto Alomar (a switch-hitter, but an injury prevented him from batting right-handed) in the first and fourth games of the American League Division Series against the Seattle Mariners. "Raffy told me that he'd like to play against Randy," Johnson said before Game 1 of his first baseman, who had hit 38 homers and driven in 110 runs that season. "But he told me that Randy could mess him up for two weeks. That was all I needed to hear.”
         Ex-slugger Chipper Jones had his ups and downs against the Big Unit. “I've also seen him make a ton of mistakes, but his stuff is so good, he gets away with them. If he's on, and your swing is off even a little, he's going to get you, and he's going to make you look really bad. I don't know how left-handed hitters hit him. I thank God every day that my dad made me a switch-hitter.”
Runner Up: Steve Carlton

Pedro Martinez Changeup
Change-Up - Pedro Martinez
         Many pitchers have dominated the game via the off speed pitch. Mastering the off speed pitch is really more about changing your speeds to make the hitters uncomfortable. The real master of the pitch is Pedro Martinez. Sure, pedro had the 98 mph fastball but it made the change-up even more deadly. Martinez displayed pinpoint control that was uncanny. The pitch helped him to 3 Cy Young awards, 8x all-star appearances and the 1999 Triple Crown award.
         The best change ups are thrown with a similar arm slot and speed, but "fall" at the end, while being anywhere from 7 to 15 MPH slower than a typical fastball. His changeup made the best power hitters look like they were trying out for the ballet. They would be so far out in front of the ball they could swing twice and still not make contact. Early in his career when his velocity was in the upper 90s he was nearly flawless. Batters would expect the speedy fastball and nearly always be burned with the changeup.
         Pedro used the circle grip for his change up, his long fingers also allowed his for extra spin when the ball was released. Because of his natural motion the pitch would appear to tail away from left handed hitters. The late break caused hitters enormous frustration and is probably the reason Pedro’s change up is the best. You just can’t account for natural movement. Martinez was careful to throw his changeup with the same arm speed as his fastball to deceive the hitter. His footwork was impeccable, giving him the needed momentum off the rubber. Like any pitcher, Martinez would make mistakes. But he was able to correct himself within the inning.
         One stat that illustrated the dominance of the change up was opponents swing and missed at an average of 25 percent of the time during the 2006 season. The league average for change-up swings and misses that year was only 15 percent. He threw the changeup a great deal and had more success with it than anyone.
         Several heroic pitching performances could be attributed to games when his changeup was on. The batters were helpless in the box against Pedro, in 1999 when he struck out 17 Yankees in a single game.
Runner up: Trevor Hoffman

Cutter - Mariano Rivera
Cutter - Mariano Rivera
         Mariano Rivera’s cutter was a problem for virtually everyone he ever faced. He’s owned the patent on the pitch no one can duplicate. Batters hated him and wood bat companies worshiped him. Widely regarded as the best closer of all time, Mariano Rivera had a tremendous career filled with accolades. One evaluator commented "Mariano's cutter is the single most devastating pitch in MLB history. Probably the only pitch that was equally predictable and devastating.”
         Rivera's cutter has been recorded as moving 8.2 inches before reaching home plate. The next closest ever measured was the Phillies Cliff Lee at 7 inches. Anytime Rivera found himself in a tight squeeze there was little question of the pitch he would go with. The cutter made hitters look down right ridiculous, watch this at-bat where he broke the hitters bat 3 times. Everyone knew the cutter was coming, and they still couldn't hit it.
         Tom Verducci of Sports Illustrated confirmed that the future Hall of Famer discovered his cutter during a 1997 road series against the Detroit Tigers. According to Rivera on that June 23rd "A gift from God, was born”.
         “The catcher was upset at me because the ball was moving and he thought I was making the ball move," Rivera says. "From that moment, I told the pitching coach, I have no control over this. The ball is moving, and I have no control.” "Didn't matter how I grabbed the ball," Rivera recalls. "It was still moving. I told Mel that I won't be throwing no more balls in the bullpen because I need to be ready for the game. We worked a lot and this thing is still the same and let's leave it like that.”
         The pitch’s genius is in its simplicity: there are no tricks or gimmicks in the delivery or execution. Instead, Rivera follows this simple routine, throw the cutter, make it break too late to detect and feather it over a corner. His pitch is somewhere between a slider and a fastball, as it is usually thrown faster than a slider but with more motion than a typical fastball. The tremendous spin-rate on the cutter, requires a wrist that’s so loose and fingers that are so long they’re able to touch his wrist. His cutter spin so furiously, the rotation delivers the ball in a straight line practically to the front edge of the plate. Only then, after a hitter has begun his swing, does the cutter reveal its lateral movement. That’s what creates the illusion of a fastball until the very last moment.
         Since that june 23rd, his regular-season opponents have a .208 batting average. When wielding the cutter in the playoffs, lineups have combined for an microscopic .172 batting average. Among the 178 individuals with at least 1,000 innings pitched since the '97 season, Rivera owns the lowest batting average on balls in play (.260 BABIP).
         “It’s like a buzz-saw,” is what Chipper Jones once said. “It just eats you up, especially if you’re a left-handed hitter. You know it’s coming, but that doesn’t really help you much.”
         David Ortiz described, “The pitch that you swing at is a fastball. The one you make contact with is the cutter. It’s unbelievable.”
Runner Up: Cliff Lee

Roger Clemens Splitfinger
Split-Finger Fastball - Roger Clemens
         The split-finger has always had more movement than its brother pitches. A split-finger fastball or splitter is a pitch in baseball derived from the forkball. It is named after the technique of putting the index and middle finger on different sides of the ball, or "splitting" them. When thrown hard, it appears to be a fastball to the batter, but appears to suddenly "drop off the table" towards home plate. Although its labeled as a fastball, the pitch actually functions as an off speed pitch. According to Mike Scioscia, the splitter was "the pitch of the ‘80s.”
         Six time Cy young award winner, Roger Clemens used the splitter to dominate hitters for his entire career. His splitter was known as one of the nastiest strike out pitches in baseball. The pitch would regularly dive into the dirt a good 10-15 inches before reaching home plate. The splitter helped transform Clemens from a great pitcher to the greatest living pitcher. It also helped Clemens to become the oldest starting pitcher in an all-star game and helped him to more than 3,000 strikeouts. Clemens threw the splitter early in his career he truly mastered the splitter at the age of 34. Many think it was the the chief reason the 11-time All-Star was able to pitch for another decade.
         Clemens learned the pitch from a well known split-finger master. "Mike Scott showed it to me at a charity golf event in Houston (in 1986). He'd had some great games with it. I honed it to my own hand because mine is different than his. We grip it the same but apply pressure to it differently.
         The pitch has been widely successful the excessive force on the arm has caused a lot of ball players to rethink throwing the pitch. While the spitter may have been the pitch of the 80’s few players are throwing it today. In 2011, only 15 starting pitchers used it as part of their regular repertoire. The pitch has been known to cause injury by the stress the split fingers puts on the elbow. Although several pitchers have thrown it only a few have truly thrown the pitch with longevity. Even though Clemens considers his fastball his signature pitch even he admits "If you see highlights from a 10 strikeout game, you'll see it five or six times for a strikeout.”
Runner-Up: Mike Scott

Orel Hershieser Sinker
Sinker - Orel Hershiser
         Sinkers are a pitch that behave just like they sound, with downward and horizontal movement. The sinker drops 3 to 6 inches more than a typical two-seam fastball which causes batters to hit ground balls more often than other fastballs, mostly due to the tilted sidespin on the ball. While a hard choice, Orel Hershiser was the most effective sinker ball pitcher of all time. A sinker ball pitcher often times has injury problems, but Hershiser played over a decade with Los Angeles. The fact that he he had a dog named sinker didn’t hurt his cause.
         Well let Hershiser tell it “I have a sinking fastball to either side of the plate, a cutter (which changes the direction of my fastball so it breaks instead of sinking), to either side of the plate, a curveball I throw at three speeds and three angles, a straight change—using the same arm speed and position as a fastball but with a grip and a release that slows it dramatically, and changeups to different locations that I throw off my sinker which look like batting practice fastballs. Different locations, different speeds, and slightly different arm angles on all those pitches give me a wide palette of choices.”
         "Orel showed me a foolproof way to grip the sinker, so that I didn't ever leave it up," Leary said. "One of the rules we had was: don't miss high. Make your mistakes below the knees. Orel went through his whole streak without ever making a mistake above the knees.”
         Hershiser threw seven shutouts in his last 11 starts in 1988. He tied a long time standing record for consecutive scoreless innings previously held by pitcher Don Drysdale. On the night of Sept. 28, Hershiser faced the Padres in San Diego needing nine shutout innings to tie Drysdale's record. "It was the best I've ever seen him pitch," says Tony Gwynn of the Padres, the best hitter in the National League and the hitter Hershiser respects the most. "Oh for four. I grounded to second base each time, each time on a sinker, although he set me up differently each time. He sure as heck knew what he was doing out there.”
         They worked at closing the angle a little, and Hershiser's sinker started diving more dramatically and his curveball became sharper. And that's just about when his streak began. "In a way, I am the extension of Koufax and Wallace on the mound," Hershiser says.
Runner-Up: Roy Halladay

fernando valenzuela Screwball
Screwball - Fernando Valenzuela
         The legend from the south, Fernando was an instant sensation in the MLB. His talents overtook Los Angles from the second he took the mound. One pitch truly amazed fans and hitters alike, his famous “El Turo” pitch which of course was the screwball. The pitch might have taken away from the longevity of Valezuelas career, but the pitch was as good to watch as any.
         A screwball itself moves bizarrely, when thrown by a right-handed pitcher, it breaks from left to right from the point of view of the pitcher; the pitch therefore moves down and in on a right-handed batter and down and away from a left-handed batter. If thrown correctly, the screwball breaks in the opposite direction of a curve ball.
         It’s thrown by turning the wrist and elbow to the outside, away from the body. If thrown right, the ball breaks away from right-handed hitters. Now, a screwball is like a unicorn, seldom have seen it and few believe it exists. The screwball has seen a sharp decline in recent years. Currently their isn't one guy in the majors who throws the pitch. Which all adds to the intrigue of the unusual pitch. The reasons and ideas behind it are being questioned, check out this article on the screwball’s extinction from the New York Times.
         When Valenzuela, then a 20-year-old rookie, faced the Expos in the deciding game of the National League Championship Series. “I’m going to throw mostly screwballs tomorrow,” Valenzuela told the coach Manny Mota over dinner. “Just watch.” Of course he would dominate that game 7 allowing no runs. Valenzuela learned the pitch two years earlier from Bobby Castillo, a mediocre reliever. “It took me a while,” Valenzuela said. “But it ended up being my best pitch.”
         The argument goes that throwing a screwball, Valenzuela's most reliable pitch, has put an unusual strain on his elbow and lower arm. "If you analyze it, your arm finishes in a more natural position than a curveball or something," Fernando said. "Whether it puts more strain on the arm, i'm not sure."
Runner Up: Christy Mathewson

Dave Stewart Forkball
Forkball - Dave Stewart
         The forkball differs from the split-fingered fastball, because the ball is jammed harder between the first two fingers. The forkball is thrown with the same arm motion and velocity as a fastball. At the release point the wrist is snapped downward, creating a spin off the middle or index finger allowing for extra movement. Although generally thrown much slower than fast balls the movement is closer to the action of a tradition curveball break.
         When Dave Stewart had his forkball going, his was the best. After coming to Oakland in 1986, Stewart would use the forkball to win 20 games or more games in each of the next four seasons. He established himself as one of baseball's most dominant pitchers. He would finish his career with 168 wins and 1,741 strikeouts.
"I always had an idea how to pitch," Stewart said. "I've just never had all the tools. The forkball made me successful." Stewart and the Death Stare put together four consecutive 20-victory seasons.
         The removal of the only wrinkle in his repertory, the 71-mile-an-hour forkball, essentially reduced Stewart to a very predictable pitcher. There's very little difference between his 90-m.p.h. fastball and his 88-m.p.h. curve-slider. The forkball simply stopped having its movement or effect. Thus Stewart had a tough time getting hitters out. The whole thing truly illustrated how reliant he was upon his favorite pitch.
Runner-Up: Hideo Nomo

Kerry Wood Slurve
Slurve - Kerry Wood
         Although it has been around for a while, not much is known about the slurve. Cy young was the earliest practitioner of the slurve, having first used it in 1890. The slurve is exactly what it sounds like, combination of curveball and slider. It is thrown like a slider with the hand grip of a curveball. People think its a sloppy pitch because of its wide break. The slurve is thrown with a greater velocity than a curveball and is thrown with more downward break than a slider.
         They think the slurve accounts for more walks and home run balls than a late breaking slider. For this reason, fans seldom see the pitch being thrown. However when thrown correctly the slurve can be a very effective weapon for pitchers.
         Ex-Chicago pitching phenomenon Kerry Wood knows all about the slurve. Wood paired his upper 90’s fastball with one of baseball’s nastiest breaking balls. The slurve could be tough to throw for a strike when a pitcher is in a funk. Wood’s slurve was remarkably accurate, as it broke anywhere from 6-14 inches over the plate. In 1998 the 20 year old Kerry Wood set the baseball world on fire by striking out 20 batters. His career was derailed of injury that most blamed on the use of his slurve. But few could deny the brilliance of his beautiful breaking ball.
         Although Wood had a short career his slurve ball remains in baseball immortality. Check out some of his best slurve pitches ever thrown.
Runner-Up: Goose Gossage

Gaylord Perry Spitball
Spitball - Gaylord Perry
         The pitch, just as it sounds was made effective by altering the ball with spit to affect how the air interacted with the ball as it headed to the plate. There was no telling how the pitch would react once thrown. Most good spitballs have a nasty late break. The spitball was banned following the 1920 season. Since then, the pitch has resulted in a number of ejections and suspensions. The greatest spitball pitcher was easily identified as Gaylord Perry, after he authored a book titled “Me and the Spitter”.
         So what was so special about Perry’s spitball? Perry played a particular mental game with his hitters. His pre windup routine featured a bevy of weird motions and touches of his mouth, arms, hat, jersey, and finally the glove (seen here). His philosophy was simple, get the hitters to think about the mysterious use of his spitball so much it would completely take them off their game. This isn't to say the man never let a wet one go. He threw plenty of spit balls in his career, they just weren't as regularly used as people like to think. The mental advantage was the real edge. Focusing on catching someone cheating is a sure fire way to distract their concentration.
         But his gamesmanship didn't end there, "When we played the Reds, I'd roll a soaked ball to Sparky (Anderson), and he'd laugh. We had fun with it."I'd shake Johnny Bench's hand. And (Pete) Rose's and (Joe) Morgan's hand," Perry said. "And my hand would be full of Vaseline. "I'd say, 'Look forward to pitching against you tomorrow.' And I go them thinking about it all that night and all day the next day.”
         "The easiest guy to get into the head of was Reggie (Jackson). I could throw him a forkball, and he'd swear it was something else. One time in Texas, he hit one off me. When he got back to the dugout, I just tipped my hat at him. We became great friends after that."
         Part of his brilliance was he was nearly impossible to catch actually throwing the pitch. Yet he never was ejected from a game for using a substance on the ball until a decade after his career had began. Take a look at the Pittsburgh Pirates absolutely loosing their minds over his pre routine.
         Perry would put vaseline on his zipper because umpires would never check there. He had a thousand different tricks and hiding places. He used the spitball and mental games to win 314 games and strike out 3,534 batters during his Hall of Fame career.
Runner Up: Burleigh Grimes

Tetsuro Kawajiri Gyroball
Gyroball “Backup Slider” - Tetsuro Kawajiri
         Literally dreamed up in the labs of Japan. The pitch was invented by a Japanese scientist, who used computer simulations to create a new style of delivery made to decrease stress on a pitcher’s arm. The pitch is primarily used by players in Japan, we think.
         The gyroball is one of the most mysterious sought after pitches in baseball history. When thrown correctly the pitch supposedly has a horizontal circular spin to it, resulting in bizarre breaks away from right handed hitters. The pitch has also been known to mysteriously drop off the table. The spin results in the baseball having no magnus force on it, as it arrives at homeplate. According to its inventor the pitch has nothing to do with the hand and all depends on the use of a pitchers arm. Another magical characteristic of the gyro is the ball leaves the pitchers hand at a fastball speed, but the spin actually causes the ball to loose velocity as it reaches the plate. At the point of release, the pitchers arm doesn’t move inwards towards the body like a typical pitch. Instead the arms is rotated so that it moves away from his body, and then toward third base.
         While their has been video of supped gyro balls, the existence of the pitch is still in question. Ii the pitch real? or just media hype? When westerners first heard of the pitch it was described as everything from a double breaking ball to pure magic. Writers and analysis let their imagination run wild thus claiming the existence of the gyroball the best thing since sliced bread. Reporters Jeff Passan and lee Jenkins approached Bonds and watched a short video of supposed gyroballs. Bonds eventually admitted the pitch just looked like a slider.
         When one questions the rotation of the baseball, one would have to think it would behave closer to a chest pass in basketball or a perfect spiral in football. The flight of the ball should be straight and true, specially if the air pressure is the same around the ball. The gyro ball is purely theoretical, born on a computer and thought up by non-baseball players. The chances of a pitcher throwing a ball with perfect perpendicular spin is little to none. Sure gyro balls have been thrown but that is usually not intentionally.
         Upon further investigation, the “gyro ball" is actually an old pitch, known under another name “The Backup Slider”. The idea behind the backup slider was that a hitter will expected an inside pitch to come across the plate like a slider but instead it will stay inside jamming the batter. The backup slider was usually known as a horribly risky pitch that routinely got bombed. Bob Gibson commented saying the backup slider was his greatest pitch but he didn't try to throw it because he usually couldn't make it do what he wanted.
Runner-Up: Daisuke Matsuzaka

Rip Sewell's Eephus Pitch
Rip Sewell's Eephus Pitch
         The ultimate low speed lob pitch, the eephus is designed to catch the hitter off guard. The eephus pitch features a high, lob-like arc and typically comes in at no more than 50-60 MPH. The pitch offers hitters two big obstacles, first they have to produce all the power themselves because the pitch is thrown at very low speeds. Second, the hitter needs to be patient and keep his hands back before he can drive the ball.
         The inventor of the pitch was its finest practitioner, Rip Sewell was a great pitcher that played in the majors for 13 seasons and was named to 4 all-star teams. Rip Sewell was hardly a strikeout pitcher, he only averaged more than three strikeouts per nine innings four times in his career. Perhaps the greatest accomplishment of Sewell’s eephus pitch was the fact that the only one player homered off the pitch, that player was Ted Williams in an all-star game. "Eephus" might mean nothing, but against the long ball, it certainly was something. The name eephus was coined by Pittsburgh outfielder Maurice Van Robays who said “Eephus ain’t nothing and that’s what that ball is.” Although we don’t agree that it is a nothing pitch, a few things made Sewell’s eephus stand out. First it had a ridiculous amount of height on it. Many of his eephus pitches were marked at a height of 25 feet.
         He learned the pitch when is career came into jeopardy when a hunting companion accidentally fired 14 pellets of buckshot into him. The damage done to his right foot required him to learn a new delivery and a new pitch to make up for his diminished fastball and curve.
         Sewell threw his first eephus pitch on April 17, 1941, striking out Cubs center fielder Dom Dallessandro and stranding two runners. The startled hitter pointed his bat at Sewell, saying, "If this was a rifle, I'd shoot you right between the eyes. The Cubs argued that the eephus was illegal, but Bill Klem, the National League's supervisor of umpires, declared it legal, which was the final word on the matter.
         Before they realized how effective the eephus could be, many batters regarded the pitch as the ultimate sign of disrespect. St. Louis third baseman Whitey Kurowski made a point of spitting tobacco juice at the ball as it floated past him. Reds shortstop Eddie Miller caught an eephus and fired it back at Sewell. Though that particular eephus never reached the catcher's mitt, the umpire called it a strike.
         Many baseball pundits balk at the usual moon ball pitch. That could be attributed to a particularly ugly piece of history that coincides with the eephus pitch. Bill Lee threw an eephus pitch in the game 7 of the 1975 World Series, at the time the Red Sox led the game 3-0. Lee threw the pitch with a 1-0 count, to slugger Tony Perez with a man on first. The pitch resulted in a towering two-run shot over the Green Monster, the Red Sox went on to loose the game 4-3 costing them a shot at their first world title since 1918.

Runner-Up: Satchel Paige

Greg Maddux - Shutto Pitch
Greg Maddux - Shuuto Pitch
         The shuuto itself was born in Japan sometime during the 1970s. Many claim the shuuto is just a term the Japanese use to refer to a number of pitches. It can describe any pitch that tails to the pitcher's arm side, including the two-seam fastball, the circle change-up, the screwball, and the split-finger fastball. Think of a good 2-seam fastball with downward movement then add a knifing motion.
         Known as “The Professor” Greg Maddux had a excellent array of pitches. His best might have been his signature shuuto Pitch. A pitch which many experts feel that Maddux throws better than anyone else ever. Similar to a sinker but with a knifing action, the shuuto is some kind of mystery. Although he threw it as a simple 2 seam fastball the pitch came out as a shuuto pitch.
         As Maddux threw the pitch it first appears as a fastball, but loses speed and rolls toward the batter. It is effective when thrown outside a batter, as it will drift back and catch the outside of the plate for a strike. It is essentially the opposite of a slider, which breaks away from the batter. The shuuto has lots of variations; Greg Maddux used his on the corner of the plate against left-handed batters.
Runner-Up: Masaji Hiramatsu

Satchel Paige's Hesitation Pitch
Satchel Paige's Hesitation Pitch
         A true throwback, Satchel Paige was one of the greatest pitchers of his era. He had a unique delivery for one of his pitches, perhaps the pitch that he was most famous for throwing. When Paige pitched the move was very much legal, now it would probably be seen as a balk. While corks and weird movements often go unseen during a pitchers delivery, it can’t be ignored.
         The "hesitation pitch" was a quirk in his delivery where he would intentionally pause after his left foot hit the ground before releasing the ball. He would hold the ball in the air and pause for an extra second. The small hesitation caused batters to struggle with their weight distribution thus throwing their timing off.
         Paige paired his hesitation pitch with his high powered fastball and tremendous breaking ball to form one of the greatest pitch varieties in baseball history. Not much has ever been said about the invention of this pitch.


The Most Intimidating Teams of All Time January 02 2017, 0 Comments

Most Intimidating Sports Teams Of All Time

           Intimidation is defined as intentional behavior that "would cause a person of ordinary sensibilities" fear of injury or harm. These teams took it a step further, displaying behavior that even their peers would deem troubling. Whether it’s fighting, drug-use, appearance, unpredictability, dominance, aggression or a potential injury, these teams caused their opponents a healthy level of fear. All of these teams pushed the envelope, having an effect on the rules in their respective sports. Did I mention, no one is intimidated by a loosing team?
89 Bad Boys Pistons
Detroit Bad Boys 1989
Who? Isiah Thomas, Dennis Rodman, Bill Laimbeer, Rick Mahorn, Chuck Dailey
Why? Strong Language, Violence, Gore, Grisly Images, Torture, Aggression, Psychological Games, Trash Talk, Jordan Rules, Injury Potential

            Have you ever heard the expression “pick on someone your own size”? This concept was mastered by the 1989 Detroit Pistons, who loved a good brawl. They played the game of basketball like escaped convicts imploring physical and mental intimidation. The Bad Boys were the most violent team, in the history of basketball. Renown for their cheap shots and no layups allowed attitude.
            Led by Dr. Jekyll himself, Isiah Thomas smiled in your face and stabbed you in the back. Rick Mahorn, Dennis Rodman and Bill Laimbeer formed a nasty front court, that could get into the heads of even the best front court players. Bill Laimbeer was a renown cheap shot artist, perhaps his finest moments came in the 1990 NBA Finals, when he frustrated Portland's big men to the point of tears. Chuck Daily also known as “Daddy Rich," kept the pack relatively under control, as the head coach.
            Detroit held a rare trait, the best players in the world were terrified of playing them. While their physical play was highly publicized, the mental games they played with opponents had devastating effects. There no layup rule often left stars like Michael Jordan, Larry Bird, Dominique Wilkins, Charles Barkley and Magic Johnson bloodied on the floor. Each of these star players saw their field goal percentage drop significantly when playing Detroit. When these stars played Detroit in the playoffs their FG% dropped even further.
            Of course their was no shortage of fights on court. Among their best fights could have been the numerous assaults on Boston’s McHale and Bird. The two teams had bench clearing brawls more than 8 times. Perhaps their most famous battle was that with Michael Jordan. The “Jordan Rules” was a strategy employed by the Pistons that called for 3 players to rush the paint anytime Michael took a dribble. They're reasoning was simple “Michael didn’t trust his teammates and we knew that” said longtime Piston Bill Laimbeer. The strategy worked as Detroit beat Chicago in three straight playoff series. For a longer list of their most famous fights and plays check out the video here.
            Technical fouls were not called nearly as much as they are now. With that being said, the Pistons still had their fair share of technical fouls. In fact from 1986-1990 the Pistons ranked first in average technical fouls per game. A recent article has even suggested that The Bad Boys had the largest number of technicals, relative to the league average in NBA history.
            The most intimidating part of it all was the back to back championship banners they hung in 1989 and 1990. The 89 season saw Detroit finish the regular season with a 63-19 record. They had the second best playoff record of all time, loosing only two games in the playoffs. While it was great to watch the physical style employed, it also led to the cotton candy style of play that dominates today.
Oakland Raiders 1976
Oakland Raiders 1976
Who? Jack Tatum, John Madden, Otis Sistrunk, Ken Stabler, Willie Brown, Skip Thomas, Dave Casper, Phil Villapiano, Ted Hendricks, Fred Biletnikoff, Cliff Branch
Why? Cocaine Use, Substance Abuse, Steroid Use, Strong Language, Violence, Gore, Grisly Images, Gang Affiliated, Torture, Illegal Equipment, Some Nudity, Aggression, Psychological Games, Injury Potential, Frightening Appearance

            “I like to believe that my best hits border on felonious assault.” These words spoken by Safety Jack Tatum summarized the 1977 Raiders. True bullies on the defensive end of the field. Their revolutionary press style and blind side hits were innovating. Opposing rival coach Chuck Knoll once commented that “They were the criminal element of the league”. Rumors of drug use on and off the field were more than speculation. Perhaps their biggest accomplishment was their ability to bend the rules.
            The 1977s Raiders featured some of the most feared defensive backs in NFL history. Nicknamed “The Soul Patrol”, they featured Jack “The Assassin” Tatum, Skip “Dr Death” Thomas, Willie Brown, and George Atkinson. Tatum was known around the league as the most devastating hitter, having knocked out over 30 players throughout his pro career. Several Tatum stories have become NFL legend. He and Earl Campbell collided head on, both were knocked out on impact. Famously his hit paralyzed wide receiver Darryl Stingley and he separated Vikings receiver Sammy White from his uniform. The rest of the defense backs were plenty intimidating. In 1976 defensive back George Atkinson knocked out receiver Lynn Swann with a forearm to the back of the head. Skip Thomas earned his Dr. Death nickname with his aggressive play. Mad men like Ted Hendricks, Phil Vilapiano and Otis Sistrunk rounded out the 11 angry men.
            On the opposite side of the ball, the offense showed they were for real. Art Shell and Gene Upshaw formed the greatest lineman combo in NFL history. Kenny Stabler was amongst the best quarterbacks in the league and might have been the toughest. Cliff Branch brought a deep threat that was unmatched by others in the time period. Dave Casper gave Stabler a big physical tight end that could both block and catch. Mr. Stick-em Fred Belitnoff was acted as the intermediate threat. Casper & Branch were both named first team all-pro.
            The Raiders intangibles were absolutely off the charts. What do I mean by intangibles? They were the first to employ themes like “Rule 1, Cheating in encouraged, rule 2, see rule number one. Another piece of the Raiders bad boy image, were the ridiculous pads and accessories they used to their advantage. Full casts were hardened and applied, so the players could use them as club-like weapons on the field. Illegal spike cleats, extra layers of padding, stick-em, anything they thought would give them an edge was used.
            Several after hours stories about this bunch have been told throughout the years. Notably Anthony Kiedis Autobiography Under the Bridge, Kiedis claimed to have sold a good amount of cocaine to more than 5 members of the 1977 Raiders team. Did I mention Kiedis was 12 and he sold it to them the night before the Superbowl? Their has been additional stories linking team members to the Hells Angels Biker gang.
            Aside from their off the field shenanigans, the Raiders were truly a dominant team. They posted a regular season record of 13-1, first in the AFC west. They went on to beat New England in the divisional round of the playoffs, before beating their rival Pittsburgh Steelers 24-7 in the Conference championship. In Super Bowl XI they dominated Minnesota to the tune of 32-14. During their playoff run, they outscored opponents 80 to 42.
1986 New York Mets
New York Mets 1986
Who? Doc Gooden, Darryl Strawberry, Keith Hernandez, Lenny Dykstra, Bobby Ojeda, Wally Backman, Joe Carter, Kevin Mitchell, Ron Darling
Why? Cocaine Use, Substance Abuse, Strong Language, Violence, Gore, Grisly Images, Some Nudity, Aggression, Psychological Games

            The cocaine circus on wheels, that was the 1986 world champion New York Mets. As pitcher Bobby Ojeda said in his book, The Bad Guys Won, “We were a bunch of vile fuckers.” With guys like Darryl Strawberry, Dwight Gooden and Keith Hernandez the 86 squad could be seen as the “kings of nose candy”. Guys like Lenny Dysktra, Bobby Ojeda, Wally Backman, Kevin Mitchell, Joe Carter and Ron Darling all contributed to the madness. The turning point of the season for the Mets, came on May 27 when third baseman Ray Knight brawled with Dodgers' pitcher Tom Niedenfuer. Summed up the Mets were a gang of drunks, pill-poppers, barroom brawlers, degenerate gamblers, cocaine enthusiasts, womanizers, and all-world egos that won the hearts of New Yorkers.
            After clinching the league championship with a 15 inning game in Houston, the Mets boarded a flight back to New York. Most of the players felt the same way, lets get on this plane and absolutely tear it apart. This included players hovering fat rails of cocaine in the bathroom, harassing the flight attendants, and racking up $7,500 in damages to the plane. Backup catcher Ed Hearn recalls “Soon steaks were flying like Frisbees. It was the epic carnivore free-for-all. ‘By the time we reached the airport, guys were eating the steaks raw,’ says Hearn. ‘Taking bites out and breathing hard and hitting each other. It was that psycho mentality.’”
            The most dominant and out of control player on the team was 21 year old ace Dwight “Doc” Gooden. After winning the Cy Young the previous year Gooden continued to pitch well to the tune of a 17-6 record and a 2.84 ERA. The only problem was Gooden was massively addicted to cocaine, so much so, he missed his teams championship parade. Gooden himself said “I end up leaving the party with the team, going to these projects, of all places in Long Island.” I got time.’ And the clocks, I mean the rooms are spinning. I said, ‘OK, I’ll leave in another hour.’ Then the next thing you know the parade’s on and I’m watching the parade on TV.
            With 5 All-Stars, their collection of pitching was the best in major league baseball. Dwight Gooden, Bobby Ojeda and Ron Darling formed a starting rotation that was second to none. Between the trio, they won 50 games with a 2.73 ERA. Their Bulletin might have been better featuring Jesse Orosco, Randy Myers and Randy Niemann.
            Daryl Strawberry was a phenomenal 24 year old prospect, batting .257 to go with a team leading 27 home runs and 93 RBIs. The night before the now-famous 1986 Game 6, Strawberry lost control. He nailed his wife in the face, breaking her nose. The bloody image of Strawberry’s domestic dispute would define him for the next decade. After the 1986 championship things started to spin out of control, he was charged with beating his fiancé in 1990 and his girlfriend in 1993.
            Keith Hernandez and Lenny Dykstra were both big contributors offensively. Hernandez hit .310 with 83 RBIs and an on base percentage of .413. Dykstra hit .295 with a team leading 31 stolen bases. Both players were named All-Star’s during the 86 campaign. Unfortunately both players were stained, after being named in the Pittsburgh Drug Trials in 1985. Baseball commissioner Peter Ueberroth ruled that Hernandez was among 7 players who had used cocaine and been involved with distribution. Both Hernandez and Dystra were able to have tremendous seasons in 1986 after rebounding from their season long suspensions in 1985.
            They finished the season with 103 wins most in the national league. During the world series everything turned around in game 6 when a ground ball went through Redsox first basemen's Bill Buckner’s legs. After that the Mets were able to rally for a game 6 win and then easily won game 7. Doc Gooden best summed up the win “But in the early craziness of the locker room, two thoughts were crowding all the others out of my head: I gotta call my dealer. And I gotta call my dad.”

78 Pittsburgh Steelers
Pittsburgh Steelers 1978
Who? Mel Blount, Jack Lambeer, Jack Ham, Mean Joe Green, Lc Greenwood, Terry Bradshaw, Franco Harris, Lynn Swann, Mike Webster
Why? Substance Abuse, Strong Language, Violence, Grisly Images, Aggression, Psychological Games, Injury Potential, Frightening Appearance

            The famed “steel curtain” dominated the NFL in the 1970s, winning 4 Superbowl's. Loaded with 7 defensive hall of famers, players like Jack Lambert, Mean Joe Green, LC Greenwood, Jack Ham and Mel Blount. They lost 2 games by a grand total of 10 points all year (both teams would reach the championship game in their respected conference). The 1978 season would mark their third championship in the 1970s. To understand the measure of respect Pittsburgh demanded at the time, the Steelers had 12 players named as All Pros at their respective positions. Some ague that the Pittsburgh teams of the early 1970s were a better defense, but this team was by far the most well rounded.
            The Steelers teams of the 1970s were stacked with intimidating defenders like “Mean” Joe Green, Lc Greenwood, Mel Blount, Jack Ham and Jack Lambert. Eight of the defense’s starting 11 players were elected to the Hall of Fame. No team will have a defense with more hall of famers at one time. The 78 team was able to finish the season with the second most forced turnovers in the league.
            Mel Blount was among the most intimidating defense backs of all time. In fact because of Blount’s legendary press converge the NFL was forced to change their rules, in turn the 5 yard contact rule is also known as the Mel Blount Rule. Joe Green was a devastation force that ranked among the most dominant lineman of his time. He was a perennial contender for the defensive player of the year award. Jack Ham and Jack Lambert were the rugged hitting linebackers that anchorched the defensive unit.
            The offense was led by Terry Bradshaw, Len Swann, John Stallworth, Franco Harris and Mike Webster. Nothing scares a defense quite long the long pass, the Steelers tormented secondaries with their air attack. Bradshaw put together the best year of his career to that point, becoming only the second Steeler to win the NFL MVP award. Bradshaw posted career highs (to date) in completions (207), attempts (368), passing yards (2,915), touchdowns (28) and quarterback rating (84.7). Len Swann both had a career year catching 11 touchdowns to go with 880 yards receiving. Deep threat John Stallworth caught 9 touchdowns to go with 800 yards receiving.
            The playoff run began with a domination of the Denver Broncos 33-10. In the AFC championship game, they embarrassed the Houston Oilers to a tune of 34-5, with Pittsburgh forcing 9 turnovers. The Steelers then finished off their storybook season with a win over the Dallas Cowboys in Super Bowl XIII. In what is still considered one of the greatest Super Bowls ever played. Terry Bradshaw took home MVP honors in Miami, as he threw for over 300 yards and four TDs.
1989 Oakland A's
Oakland A’s 1989
Who? Mark McGwire, Jose Canseco, Dave Stewart, Dennis Eckersley, Tony La Russa
Why? Cocaine Use, Substance Abuse, Steroid Use, Strong Language, Violence, Cheating, Aggression, Power, Frightening Appearance

            The 89 Athletics were the George Washington of Steroids, leading the way for future generations. “The Juice Crew” were the bros of your nightmares, fueled by steroids and success. This team was an all time great power hitting lineup, most of which powered by steroids. Rumors swirled of drug use and fights in the Oakland clubhouse, mainly between the young regime and the old veterans. The crew also had a signature handshake that featured forearm bumps instead of fists bumps.
            Oakland boasted some of the best power hitters in the game like Mark McGwire, Dave Henderson, Dave Parker and Jose Canseco. They didn’t just hit regular home runs, these were moon shots. Blasts like Canseco's and McGwire's famous home runs to the third deck of Toronto's Skydome (both blasts went over 520 feet). They also featured the speedy leadoff man Ricky Henderson. Add Dennis Eckersley to the bunch, one of the most feared closers of all time. The bay area native posted a 1.56 ERA and led the league in saves with 33. The collection of ego’s and personalities might be enough to intimidate any team. Throw in passive aggressive steroid behavior and you have a frightening team.
            Canseco suffered a wrist injury before the season and didn’t return until after the All-Star break. Dave Parker filled some of the power void and hit 22 home runs and finished with 97 RBI. And when Canseco did come back, he hit 17 home runs in less than a half-season of play. The sensational Mark McGwire hit 33 home runs to lead the team.
            Oakland was able to finish the season first in their division, with 99 wins. They defeated the Toronto Blue Jays in five games in the ALCS. Then swept their cross-Bay rivals, the San Francisco Giants, in an earthquake-marred World Series. They only lost one game in postseason play putting them near the top of all time dominating post seasons.
            When Jose Canseco’s book Juiced was published in 2005, many of the A’s stories would come to limelight. Canseco claims that he introduced Mark McGwire to steroids in 1988 and that he often injected McGwire while they were teammates. He also admits that he envisions himself as the godfather of steroids to the entire MLB.
            While they haven't played together for more than 25 years, a reunion seems unspeakable. Former teammate Carney Lansford was quoted as saying if Canseco were coming to the reunion, "I don't believe there's a guy on the '89 team who'd show up. Not after his book and all the lives he ruined. It's selfishness, basically. I hate to say that, really. I played with him and thought he was a nice guy, but I don't know how you can do that to people."
1985 Chicago Bears
Chicago Bears 1985
Who? Mike Ditka, Mike Singletary, Otis Wilson, Buddy Ryan, Walter Payton, Jim McMahon, Dan Hampton, Richard Dent, Buddy Ryan
Why? Substance Abuse, Strong Language, Violence, Gore, Grisly Images, Some Nudity, Aggression, Psychological Games, Injury Potential, Frightening Appearance

            The Monsters of the Midway could make an argument for the greatest overall team of all time. This team didn’t need sideshows or gimmicks to intimidate their opponents, they flat dominated them. Probably the only team on the list that didn’t feature the most menacing player, a group of fighters, or even the biggest group of partiers. This collection of talent was most imposing during the actual game. They embarrassed almost every pro offense they faced and as a result the defensive side of the ball was never the same. NFL network named them the best defensive unit of all time.
            They went 15-1 during the regular season, their lone loss came at the hands of Dan Marino’s Miami dolphins. In the playoffs they laughed teams off the field, outscoring opponents 91 to 10. During the entire season Chicago was only involved in three games decided by 7 or less.
            The 85 defense was simply the greatest defense of all time. Imploring the physical strategy of the 4-6 defense, Chicago was the most feared defense of their time. They had a bevy of tremendous players like Mike Singletary, The Fridge, Otis Wilson, Mongo McMichael, Dan Hampton and Richard Dent. The master mind of it all was of course an intimidator himself, Buddy Ryan. The Bears' iconic 46 defense (Named after former Bears' safety, Doug Plank), led by Defensive genius Buddy Ryan, was an "attack from all angles" scheme that resulted in many injured quarterbacks. With future Hall of Famer Mike Singletary alongside the supremely athletic Wilber Marshall and Otis Wilson, the linebacking unit ranked in at #5 of the greatest linebacking corps in NFL history in NFL Top 10. The secondary was anchored by safeties Gary Fencik and Dave Duerson. Their defensive line included future Hall of Famers Richard Dent and Dan "Danimal" Hampton , along with breakout media superstar rookie, William "The Refrigerator" Perry. The Bears were infamous for getting to the quarterback often and completely disrupting their timing. They hold a bevy of bone crushing defensive highlights, complete with multiple quarterback knockouts.
            The offense was no slouch led by Walter “Sweetness” Payton (perhaps the best running back in the game at the time), wild man Jim McMahon and the intimidating coach Mike Ditka. Their offense ranked 2nd in the league in points scored. The real strength of their offensive, was their offensive line. Led by tackle Jimbo Covert and center Jay Hilgenberg, they were able to open huge running holes for Walter Payton. At the end of the season Payton, McMahon, Covert and Hilgenberg were all named to the pro bowl.
            In their two playoff games against the New York Giants and Los Angeles Rams, the Bears outscored their opponents 45–0 and became the first team to record back-to-back playoff shutouts. Then, in Super Bowl XX against the New England Patriots, the Bears set several records. Their 36-point margin of victory topped the Raiders 29 points margin put up in Super Bowl XVIII and stood as a record until the 49ers won Super Bowl XXIV. It was the Bears' first NFL World Championship title since 1963.
            The 1985 bears changed the game with their hard hitting aggressive 4-6 defense. The 4-6 allowed for their defense to get serious hits on quarterbacks and skill players. The only question is, Why did they only win 1?
1974 Philadelphia Flyers
Philadelphia Flyers 1974
Who? Dave Schultz, Bobby Clarke, Serge Bernier, Jim Johnson, Bernie Parent
Why? Strong Language, Violence, Gore, Grisly Images, Torture, Illegal Equipment, Aggression, Psychological Games, Injury Potential, Frightening Appearance, Excessive Blood

            They revolutionized the physical style of hockey popular today. Their players refused to wear helmets and led the league in penalty minutes. Their defense specialized in cheap shots and they instigated as many brawls as possible. Opposing teams preparing to play the Flyers knew they were in for a beating. The Broadstreet bullies were as dominant as they were mean, winning back to back Stanley Cup champions in 1974 and 1975. The Flyers were the last Stanley Cup champion to be composed entirely of Canadian-born players.
            Early in the 70’s Philadelphia was defeated by the St Louis Blues who employed a more physical style of play than the Flyers. As a result the Flyers brought in bigger and tougher players (also known as bullies). The new additions to the team resulted in a jail house team that routinely broke rules and used fighting to intimidate opponents.
            This blood thirsty, ragtag collection of asylum escapees included Bobby Clarke, Serge Bernier, Jim Johnson, Bernie Parent (who wore a menacing Jason mask) and Andre Lacriox. The leader of the asylum was Dave “The Hammer” Schultz. “The Hammer” set the NHL record for penalty minutes in back to back seasons during their Stanley Cup runs. He was best known for his blood filled mustache that often dripped relentlessly. Of course Dave Schultz's 348 penalty minutes led the NFL in 1974.
            The 1974 team posted a record of 50-16-12, they won the West by seven points. The outstanding goalie Bernie Parent established an NFL record by winning 47 games, a record which stood for more than 30 years. The Flyers were represented in the All Star Game by Bobby Clarke, Bernie Parent, Ed Van Impe and Joe Watson.
            The team was led offensively by Bobby Clarke, who led the team in goals with 35, assists with 52 and points with 87. He finished fifth among scoring leader in points. Clarke was named a 2nd Team All Stars along with defenseman Barry Ashbee. Clarke was followed by Bill Barber in goals (34), and by Rick MacLeish both in assists (45) and in points (77).
            Like any intimidating team the Flyers style of play eventually forced the NHL to change its rules. An exhibition game against the Russian team, illustrated the brutality and physicality the Flyers played with. In most peoples eyes this exhibition game forced the NHL to institute new rules to clean up the game.
79 Pirates
Pittsburgh Pirates 1979
Who? Willie Stargell, Dave parker, Omar Moreno, Bill Robinson, Bill Madlock, Dock Ellis
Why? Cocaine Use, Substance Abuse, Strong Language, Violence, Illegal Equipment, Aggression, Frightening Appearance, Sledgehammer

            They became known as the “We Are Family” team, the Pirates powered their way to the 1979 crown. The Pirates became one of six teams in the 20th century to have won a World Series after trailing three games to one. They beat the Baltimore Orioles in a seven game world series, Willie Stargell took home the MVP. The curricular activities of the Pirates was surely over shadowed by their accomplishments on the field. The world series title was Pittsburgh’s last playoff series victory to date. However many think the Pittsburgh Cocaine trails might have diminished their accomplishments.
            The leaders of the team were Willie Stargell and Dave “Cobra” Parker. Both carried heavy reputations as intimidating hitters, as both were amongst the best players in baseball. Parker was the 1978 NL MVP and Stargell took home the award in 1979. Bill Madlock and Bill Robinson both provided instant offensive at the plate.
            Willie Stargell got a brilliant idea for their hitters to warm up with sledgehammers. The move intimidated opposing pictures and helped the Pirates confidence. Late in the 1978 season “Cobra” fractured his jaw in a home plate collision. He then wore a hockey-style mask straight from Friday the 13th, to protect his broken cheek bone. The mask was described by some opposing pitchers as terrifying. While the corrective mask was only worn for a short period of time, it made its mark.
            The Pittsburgh drug trials shined more light on this collection of talent. Drug use ran rampant throughout the team’s clubhouse. Cocaine was done in record amounts and greenies were popped like skittles in the clubhouse. More than 5 players on the team would eventually be named specifically in the drug trials. Theres no question their drug use contributed to they're intimidating ways.
New York Knicks 1992
New York Knicks 1992
Who? Anthony Mason, Patrick Ewing, Charles Oakley and Xavier McDaniel, John Starks
Why? Strong Language, Violence, Gore, Grisly Images, Torture, Aggression, Psychological Games, Frightening Appearance, Trash-talk, Injury Potential

            The 1992 New York Knicks loved to mix it up on the court. Prior to the season New York hired Pat Riley, signed Anthony Mason and traded for Xavier McDaniel. These additions insured little physical opposition from their opponents. The only team on our list that failed to win the title. New York seemed destined to win a title under the guidance of Pat Riley, who had won five titles in Los Angeles.
            The core of New York’s intimidating lineup was formed by their front line. They featured Patrick Ewing, Anthony Mason, Xavier McDaniel and Charles Oakley. A front line which rivaled the Detroit's Bad Boys in terms of physical play and sheer terror. It was unusual for more than 3 games to go by without the Knicks having some sort of fight. Patrick Ewing was widely thought of as the most intimidating player in the NBA. Charles Oakley was a world renown fighter who fought the likes of Charles Barkley, Dennis Rodman,  Alonzo Mourning, and Pj Brown among many others. Xavier McDaniel aka “X-Man” was known around the league as a serious fighter. McDaniel would fight you at the drop of a hat, or strangle you if he deemed fit (see Wes Matthews and Juwan Howard). Very few opposing teams chose to challenge prowess of the front line’s fighting ability.
            Greg Anthony and Mark Jackson were both among the toughest guards in the league. Jackson had a no-nonsense city game and Anthony once played with a broken jaw for more than a month. The ever unpredictable John Starks also had reputation for being a loose cannon, apparent by the head butt he delivered to Reggie Miller in the 1993 Playoffs.
            The team finished second in the Atlantic Division with a 51–31 record. In the first round of the playoffs New York would square off with the 92 version of the Bad Boys Pistons. In a series that closely resembled a cage match, it was the most physical series of all time. During game 1, McDaniel delivered a vicious elbow to Lambieers head resulting in a flagrant foul and a scuffle. In game 2, McDaniel drew a flagrant foul against Laimbeer, before Charles Oakley closed lined Dennis Rodman, both wind up with technicals. In the next game four technical fouls were called in the first three minutes. Rodman then punched McDaniel, resulting in the two tangling up. During the fourth quarter, Darrell Walker earned a flagrant foul for bashing McDaniel, who screamed threats at Walker. All this in the first three games. The Knicks would end up beating Detroit in 5 games.
            Next round, the Knicks faced off against the defending champion Chicago Bulls for the second straight year. Bill Laimbeer of the vanquished Detroit Pistons thought the Knicks would strongly compete if they were allowed to play this way, but doubted "the league" would let them. To the contrary, Phil Jackson said of the NBA, "I think they like this style." Several players including, Michael Jordan, Xavier McDaniel, Scottie Pippen and Greg Anthony got into physical altercations. New York was able to frustrate Michael Jordan with their physical play, but ultimately lost to Chicago in 7 games. During the offseason McDaniel left for Boston, New York never took Chicago to seven games again. Many observers think it was the closest any team got to stopping Chicago’s run of 6 championships in the 90’s.

1927 New York Yankees
New York Yankees 1927
Who? Babe Ruth, Lou Geriehg, Earle Combs, Tony Lazzeri, Herb Pennock, Waite Hoyt, Miller Huggins
Why? Drinking, Strong Language, Violence, Aggression, Psychological Games

            Murder’s Row was the Beatles more than 25 years before the Beatles. They featured seven hall of famers on their roster. The first truly intimidating team in sports, opposing pictures and sports writers were so obsessed with the team, they were nicknamed the Murders Row for the core of they're hitting lineup. Following a 21-1 July victory against the Washington Senators, first basemen Joe Judge said “Those fellows not only beat you but they tear your heart out. I wish the season was over.” Murders Row existed in a time where super teams were more than 50 years away. The 1927 Yankees batted .307, slugged .489, scored 975 runs, and outscored their opponents by a record 376 runs. Did I mention they had the two most feared hitters in the game?
            The nickname describes the first six hitters in the 1927 team lineup: Earle Combs, Mark Koenig, Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Bob Meusel, and Tony Lazzeri. Center fielder Earle Combs had a career year, batting .356 with 231 hits, left fielder Bob Meusel batted .337 with 103 RBIs, and second baseman Tony Lazzeri drove in 102 runs. Gehrig batted .373, with 218 hits, 47 home runs, a then record 175 RBIs and was voted A.L. MVP. Ruth amassed a .356 batting average, 164 RBIs, 158 runs scored, walked 137 times, and slugged .772. Most notably, he set the single season home run record with 60.
            The two most intimidating hitters in baseball, Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, were bitter rivals in the same clubhouse. Their differences in personality created a rift between the superstars. Ruth was an undisciplined man in every facet of his life, except hitting. While Gehrig, was never one for empty boasting. Another factor in their rift was differences in salary between the two. Babe made $80,000 during the height of the Great Depression, Gehrig less than half that amount. The two rivals would duel off in a season long home run contest. Early in the season, the New York World-Telegram anointed Gehrig the favorite. But Ruth caught Gehrig and then had a remarkable last two months of the season, hitting 17 home runs in September. After his 60th, Ruth was exultant, shouting after the game, "Sixty, count 'em, sixty! Let's see some son-of-a-b**** match that!"
            They finished the year 110–44 winning the A.L. pennant by 19 games. New York swept the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1927 World Series. Only four teams have won more regular season games to this date. Unquestionably one of the greatest teams in MLB history.

Hope you enjoyed the list, leave a comment below and tell us what we missed!







The Legend of Wade "Chicken Man" Boggs July 08 2016, 0 Comments

Wade Boggs Miller Lite

Wade Boggs is the best beer drinker of all time. The hall of fame baseball player is better known for his drinking habits than the 3,000 hits he racked up or his 5 batting titles. Tales of Boggs have been a large part of sports pop culture for a number of years. Boggs obsession with Chicken, his horse ride after his World Series victory or the mere 46 times he swing and missed in the 1985 season. His most famous story, is his 1994 flight in which Boggs reportedly drank 64 beers starting in Cleveland and ending in Boston.

The legend started to build in 2003 when former Yankee and Mariner reliever Jeff Nelson was on KJR radio in Seattle. He said Boggs could easily drink 50-60 beers on a trip from New York to Seattle. Later in the interview, Nelson called former teammate Paul Sorrento on the air. Sorrento confirmed Nelson’s story and estimated that Boggs could actually drink 70 beers on a cross-country trip.

Jeff Nelson offered a simple look into the daily travel of Boggs. “Wade was always the first one at the club house, he would bring a six pack with him. He’d be there drinking a beer when someone showed up, and as we were all packing our stuff up out of our lockers and getting our bags ready for the trip, Wade would sit there and drink that whole six pack.We were flying out of New Jersey, so it was a drive from Yankee stadium to the airport in New Jersey. Wade would drink another couple of beers on the bus to the airport. At the time, we were flying this older airplane, it couldn’t make it across the country without refueling, so we would stop in North Dakota or something. Wade would drink about a half rack between New Jersey and North Dakota. During they half hour they refueled in North Dakota, Wade would have a few more beers. Back up in the air, Wade would drink another 10, 11, 12 beers on the way out to the west coast. The whole flight from coast to coast usually took us well over 7 hours. We’d touch down, hop on the bus headed to the Kingdome, and Wade would have another beer or two on the bus. Then, all of us would get to the Kingdome and unpack our bags and sit around and BS with each other, and Wade would have a beer in his hand the entire time. He was always one of the last people to leave the club house too.”


After the radio interview, a fan on College Game Day held a sign that read “Did you know Wade Boggs once drank 64 beers on a cross country flight”. This led Tony Kornheiser on ESPN’s Pardon the Interruption to ask Boggs about the story. Boggs responded by saying “No it's not true, it wasn't 64, but a lot of people have fun with that and its nothing to brag about. You get board on a cross country flight from Boston to LA, you gotta do something. No, I wont answer the number but put it this way I had a few Miller Lites".

An interview featuring major leaguer Brian Rose exposed more of Boggs habit. In 2001 Rose was claimed off waiver by the Devil Rays while Wade Boggs was a coach there. Rose goes on to describe a flight in which he sat next to Boggs “I was sitting next to him on a plane and a flight attendant came by and gave him a case of beer,” said Rose. “He slid it under the seat and I was like, ‘What’s up with that? We only have an hour flight.’ He said, ‘That’s mine.’ Rose continued “The whole flight, we were just shooting the shit, and he went one beer after the other. I said to him, ‘I’m impressed with the way you hit, but I’m more impressed right now.’ He goes, ‘Yeah, beer doesn’t affect me. I don’t get drunk unless I’ve had at least a case and a half.’ I don’t think he even went to the bathroom.”


In 2015 the story was reexamined, Always Sunny In Philadelphia ran an episode honoring Boggs 64 beers on a flight. Wade plays a ghost of himself in the episode. Behind the scenes Boggs told the shows creator Charlie Day that he once drank 107 beers in a day.

So how exactly is this possible? The skeptics point to the fact that Boggs blood alcohol level would be too high to possibly drink that many beers. Those same skeptics forget to factor in alcohol tolerance into the equation. Maxim magazine called the statement “bullshit” in a recent article. Boggs’ weight was 197 pounds, cans of Miller Lite are 12 ounces and contain 4.2% alcohol. He drank 64 cans of Miller Lite over a 4 hour flight. Taking into consideration his large tolerance level for alcohol you can’t make a realistic estimate on his blood alcohol level. Critics say that much alcohol would kill anyone, however on their scale 40 beers would kill someone. In a recent interview with TMZ, the Chicken-Man finally admitted to drinking more than 100 beers in a day. His choice of beer? Miller Lite of course.

Restock Trippsburgh LSD No Hitter July 23 2015, 0 Comments

Tripsburgh LSD No Hitter - Dock Ellis
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New Heavy Hitters T-Shirt Available June 04 2015, 1 Comment

Check out our new Heavy Hitters T-Shirt featuring the best hitters from baseball history.
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Congrats to the 2015 Baseball Hall of Fame Inductees January 09 2015, 0 Comments

Congrats to the 2015 Baseball Hall of Fame Inductees - Legends Clothing Company

Doc Ellis Lsd No Hitter Tee January 02 2015, 0 Comments

Legends Clothing Doc Ellis LSD Shirt
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